Companies could be forced to delete customer data used to prove ID, Labor suggests

Companies could have the right to retain customers’ data stripped back by an ambitious suite of privacy reforms proposed by the Albanese government. The attorney general, Mark Dreyfus, revealed on Thursday that in addition to completing a review of Australia’s privacy laws, the Albanese government will look to legislate “even more urgent reforms” later this year or in early 2023. The immediate reforms could include penalties, safeguards on personal information and strengthening requirements for companies to notify customers of breaches. On Thursday, the prime minister, Anthony Albanese, endorsed changes to data retention laws. Albanese told FiveAA Radio that requiring companies to dispose of data when they no longer need it, such as after a customer leaves a provider, was a “pretty commonsense proposal” and confirmed it was under consideration. Earlier, Dreyfus told reporters in Canberra the government was considering whether companies “should be permitted to go on keeping data when the purpose of collecting it in the first place might have been no more than establishing someone’s identity”. Checking a customer’s driver’s licence or passport number to establish their identity “should be the end, one might think, of the company keeping all that data”, he said. “They don’t seem to...

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